paint brushes in a vase

Edgelands at the Canolfan Y Celfyddydau

Edgelands Exhibition

I drove over to Aberystwyth today to visit Canolfan Y Celfyddydau, otherwise known as the Aberystwyth Arts Centre. The main exhibition ‘Edgelands’, takes its inspiration from the overlooked areas of land on the borders of the town and the countryside. These are the outskirts of cities that hardly receive any attention. This collection of contemporary painting celebrates these forgotten margins of our landscape. They challenge us to consider how we perceive the world. Not just in terms of what we see, but also how we feel and behave like a developing civilisation.

Artists on Show

Some of the featured artists include; Barbara Howey, Marguerite Horner, Lee Maelzer and Day Bowman.

Horner’s works offer a snapshot of the seemingly mundane: a sliver of dual carriageway in profile, a petrol station or a rundown shop, in a tired suburban street.

Of her work, she says, “My paintings aim to investigate, among other things, notions of transience, intimacy, loss and hope.” She uses two colours. A brown and blue. They are Sennelier colours from France. They are quite buttery and they produce the right quality of tone. She says, “If I use Windsor and Newton, it doesn’t produce the same colours for some reason. I got that from reading about Whistler. He used these two colours and I was experimenting with other peoples grounds and colours. I talk to other artists about the way Lucien Freud worked, and how his paintings are so enigmatic because he uses warm and cool tones.”

Howey states, “My work uses painting to think about issues around location and memory. I use images from the internet of places I once lived. What is interesting is that these images have very a personal resonance for me, even though they were taken by other people. They track the past and present by showing places that once existed, still exist or have been redeveloped. They even suggest the future through the documentation of the building sites in progress. How we access personal pasts and memory through collective and cultural memory is an ongoing theme in my work.”